Ancestors, Land, Mother Earth

Making Earth Amends with Rainbow Beads

 

I buy a rainbow-lavender beaded bracelet from a Native American woman I meet at the Fairy Congress this year. We trade stories about fairies from our own traditions. I am honored to meet her and make amends between our cultures. Her nephew offers his drum songs to awaken the fairies of the land with his indigenous voice. The Fey perk up when they hear him. We do too. His song moves deep into our hearts.

Danielle beaded my bracelet as we sang the Angel Wash song and moved through a human tunnel of love called the Angel Wash ritual. The beaded bracelet is infused with potent love as she beaded it. It feels blessed. Blessed by the magical land of Skalitude where the Fairy Congress is held. Present on the land are millions upon millions of faeries and nature spirits, the magical people, the Sidhe (fairy race), ancestral land spirits, and her Cree spirit and Grandmothers. I place it on my wrist. It fits perfectly.

I wear the bracelet for two days, then it breaks and falls to the earth. For some reason, I am not upset. Later that day, a friend invites me to join a group going to see the petroglyph in the Columbia River Gorge called She Who Watches. We are asked to bring beads as an offering.

I realize there is a full circle here. I am going to She Who Watches to offer her the rainbow beads from the bracelet made by Danielle (Cree, Montana homelands).

As an earth alchemist, I am always responsive to ways I (or we) can make amends to the caretakers of the lands. In the USA, our indigenous people are nurturers of Mother Earth, and when they were/are harmed it affects not only their soul, but their children for many generations, and the earth herself. We may have forgotten, but all people are meant to be nurturers of Mother Earth.

As humans mend their ways and come into co-creative relationship with all of creation once again, the Mother Earth responds with great joy. And, we open our hearts to greater joy and community with all of our rainbow sisters and brothers. Danielle told us about the Cree elders stories they heard when they were children. In their stories, they were taught that they needed to be-friend the white-faced people who would be coming to their lands. This was their way towards peace.

I went to see She Who Watches with Celilo guide Ed Edmo and our group. We recognized and honored the ancestors of the lands when we got there and felt them circle around us and usher us into their sacred place. I bring my beads. I say my prayers to the ancient stone grandmother. It was a powerful experience.

I am always humbled to have experiences of being offered permission to visit and honor these sacred sites. I never take it for granted. I walk with the ancient ancestors to make amends by being grateful and honoring of Mother Earth. These ancestors of the land recognize who we are by our pure hearts.

Gazing at the petroglyph I felt the power of witnessing. Watching with loving eyes at what occurs in this crazy world is very potent. When it is offered without judgement or need to change, fix, heal anything, this gaze becomes powerful medicine for all beings—seen and unseen.

I felt loved and seen by the ancient stone Grandmother. She Who Watches teaches us how to see ourselves and the world with eyes of acceptance and love.